Latest entries

Dec
10

Reporting on the uses of #nswpubliclibraries and #libraryact75th

It is almost a year since we started to use and encourage you to use the hashtag #nswpubliclibraries. We launched it with a blog post and were very interested to see what would happen. On Flickr the hashtag has been used over 400 times. The libraries using it include Kiama, Canterbury, Coffs Harbour, Shoalhaven, Mosman and Riverina Regional.  Please add your library photographs to the group.

Instagram (which Public Library Services joined on 10 February 2014) has also featured with #nswpubliclibraries. The hashtag has been used almost 300 times by several libraries including Canada Bay, Campbelltown, Inverell, and Mona Vale.

Twitter shows over 530 uses of this hashtag. This graph shows the most frequent users of this tag. Mousing over the pie chart will show the names of the twitter accounts, and scrolling with your mouse over the image will provide more details. You can look at the tweets too.

#nswpublic libraries is also being used on Facebook - you can see a couple of recent examples here.  If you login to Facebook and search on the hashtag you will see many more. (note - this is a later addition to this post).

In November public libraries celebrated the 75th anniversary of the Library Act. We encouraged libraries to use #libraryact75th across all social media platforms to share stories and photos of their celebrations. Use of the hashtag peaked on 3 November, with libraries taking to Twitter to celebrate the anniversary. Analysis via Twitonomy showed that in the week of 2 November to 8 November 239 tweets were counted using #libraryact75th with a potential reach of 545,072. The number of users in this period was 123. The top related hashtag during this period was #nswpubliclibraries, showing that both hashtags were being used in Tweets.

You can see a summary of the #libraryact75th action on Twitter.

Throughout the month of October, in the lead up to the anniversary of the Library Act, we led a social media campaign called #libraryaday. This campaign featured each library service via the State Library Twitter account and Facebook page and the Libraryact75th blog.

The hashtags #libraryaday and #libraryact75th were promoted. There was a very positive response from public libraries to this campaign, with libraries tweeting about their own library services, other library services and the anniversary of the Library Act.

We are very pleased to see public libraries using their own hashtags – and we did a storify of the examples we have found. Let us know any more examples we should add to it.

Anne Doherty, Edwina Duffy and Ellen Forsyth

Nov
17

#exploreyourarchives - United Kingdom archives promotion

Last week there was a lovely promotion about archives in the UK, called #exploreyourarchives.

As you can tell with the hashtag they made great use of social media. There was excellent cooperation between different archives. There are also some very good examples of the use of Storify.


You can find out more here from the National Archives and the collaborative site

 

Nov
4

Parkes Library is ready for International Games Day

At Parkes Library, we've always been interested in bringing games and play to the community. For us, libraries have never just been about shelves; they're a place where people come for learning, entertainment, and adventure on their own terms. In 2014, we decided to celebrate this by sharing a free tabletop game with libraries around the world. It's out this month, in time for International Games Day @ Your Library on 15th November.

 In previous years, we've pushed the boundaries of librarianship to include messy play with paints and puddingssteampunk time travel, and live action zombie roleplay in the spooky setting of a rural showground. This October, we had the opportunity to create Australia's first Fun Palace, connecting to an international network of public spaces offering people the chance to explore art and science.

 Our Fun Palace featured a range of activities, including many designed by local kids and teens. Our play consultant Matt Finch had spotted an article in the "Dungeons and Dragons" magazine Gygax,written by author, journalist, and activist Cory Doctorow. He adapted the article to create an all-ages game that could be played anywhere, using paper superhero characters, Lego bricks for health points, a few dice and a tape measure.

 We approached Cory Doctorow and Gygax Magazine for permission to distribute our remixed game. They kindly added a Creative Commons Licence to the original article so that we could share our adaptation and give proper credit. The game was then featured on technology and culture site BoingBoing.

We serve a community of just 15000 people in Central West New South Wales, but we wanted to show that with a bright idea and a bit of tenacity, even the very smallest libraries can create activities and resources with huge potential impact.

 You can download the Tabletop Superheroes game from our town's website for book lovers, Dog-Eared, www.dog-eared.me.

A guest post by Dr Matt Finch and Parkes Library Team 

Oct
7

Roly Keating Keynote Speaker at ALIA National

The first morning of the ALIA National Conference started with keynote speaker Roly Keating, from the British Library, who spoke of the challenges that the Library faced as it adapted to the digital age. Roly is Chief Executive of the Library, moving from the BBC in 2012 where he was Director, Archive Content.

Although the collections cover the vast richness of not only British but indeed world history the British Library itself, as a national library, is a relatively young institution, having only been established in 1973 (by the British Library Act 1972). The Library was recently relocated to a new purpose built building in St Pancras, an unpopular move in some minds as this area is located in undesirable disused railway yards. However, as Roly pointed out using a Google Earth map – Google themselves are now taking up residence next door and so the neighbourhood is not as “bad” as it once may have seemed.

Roly gave an engaging talk about the many different roles that the British Library has in collecting, conserving and preserving materials and information. Firstly the Library has a pre-eminent place in preserving British history and in presenting Britain to the world. Whether this is through collaborating with scholars on a guide for young people for discovering British literature or the acquisition of a scrap of paper upon which John Lennon wrote the lyrics that Paul McCartney would appropriate to write “Penny Lane” or the plan to begin saving all sites with the .uk domain to preserve the “digital memory” of Britain, the idea is to showcase British history, life and culture to its people and the world.
He also spoke about partnerships with outside organisations such as Google to digitise collections, and the future potential of crowd sourcing and open source labs to open up collections and materials for future use. 
Roly also spoke about the need for library staff to evolve in the way that we work. We need to rapidly develop new skills.  We need to collaborate/connect/digitise and work together for deep, rich, interconnected archive.
https://twitter.com/justine_hyde/status/511667856665092096/photo/1 embed
For more insights on Roly’s talk see:
http://connectinglibrarian.com/2014/09/19/alia-biennial-conference-day-1/
http://ireadthisthing.wordpress.com/2014/09/22/alia-melbourne-2014-conference-report-the-british-library-in-a-globalised-world/

Roly gave an engaging talk about the many different roles that the British Library has in collecting, conserving and preserving materials and information. Firstly the Library has a pre-eminent place in preserving British history and in presenting Britain to the world. Whether this is through collaborating with scholars on a guide for young people for discovering British literature or the acquisition of a scrap of paper upon which John Lennon wrote the lyrics that Paul McCartney would appropriate to write “Penny Lane” or the plan to begin saving all sites with the .uk domain to preserve the “digital memory” of Britain, the idea is to showcase British history, life and culture to its people and the world.He also spoke about partnerships with outside organisations such as Google to digitise collections, and the future potential of crowd sourcing and open source labs to open up collections and materials for future use. Roly also spoke about the need for library staff to evolve in the way that we work. We need to rapidly develop new skills. We need to collaborate/connect/digitise and work together for deep, rich, interconnected archive.

For more insights on Roly’s talk see:

Andrea Curr

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